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The Luxury Cruise Review

Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom

Editors rating:
4.0
/5.0
Very good

Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom

Editors rating:
4.0
/5.0
Very good

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom feels just right for a large, premium cruise ship. However, there are some drawbacks worth knowing.

By Published On: 8 Aug 2022

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The Verandah Staterooms on Rotterdam are cozy, stylish retreats. While modest in size, clever design enhances the sense of space. This is especially so in the chic bathroom – a real surprise. Also, there is a genuinely spacious verandah with reclining deck chairs.

The decor in the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom can best be described as ‘Dutch-modern’. There are beechwood cabinets as well as soft furnishings in tones of grey and cream. Brushed silver highlights give it a stylish lift.

It’s all very smart. Indeed, Rotterdam’s Verandah Staterooms feel just right for a large, premium cruise ship. However, there are some drawbacks like poor soundproofing. Indeed, public announcements or even guests talking in the corridors may be enough to disturb light sleepers.

Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom ratings

RoomRating
Size
(3.5)
Design
(4.0)
Cleanliness
(5.0)
Condition
(5.0)
Sitting space
(3.0)
Closet space
(3.5)
Soundproofing
(2.0)
Balcony
(4.0)
BathroomRating
Size
(4.0)
Storage space
(4.0)
Products
(4.0)
Towels
(4.0)
Shower/bath
(5.0)
Cleanliness
(5.0)
Condition
(5.0)
BeddingRating
Comfort
(4.5)
Condition
(5.0)
Pillow options
(3.0)
Blanket options
(4.0)

The living space

The living space is modest in size, but clever design makes it feel more roomy. Also, there are thoughtful features that are sure to please modern cruisers.

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom has a combined sleeping and sitting area. There is a comfortable Mariner’s Dream bed as well as a plush Euro-Top mattress. It can be configured as a queen or twin-bed setup. The choice is yours.

A Verandah Stateroom which forms part of this Rotterdam review.
Rotterdam’s Verandah Staterooms are cozy retreats, with some clever design features.

In addition there is a padded headboard, as well as night stands on either side of the bed. These are ideal for storing spectacles and reading material. There are also night lamps and multi-directional reading lights.

Also, there are bedside power outlets as well as USB slots for charging mobile devices. However, it’s worth noting these are not compatible with new USB-C connected devices.

The sitting area in a Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
The small sitting area has a petit coffee table.

In the sitting area there is a small sofa and a little coffee table. Though it has to be said, this table did tend to get in the way. There is also a writing desk with three US and two European power outlets, as well as USB-A connectivity.

The writing desk in the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
The writing desk in the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
US and European power outlets on Rotterdam.
US, European and USB-A power outlets on Rotterdam.

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom has a large, wall mounted interactive TV. It is sure to be appreciated by modern cruisers, with movies on-demand and the ability to view your itinerary or see your shipboard account.

The living space also has a small bar area with room for glassware and bottles.

A spacious Rotterdam verandah

The glass-fronted verandah might just be the best part of the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom. It is surprisingly spacious and delightfully private.

This picture show the veranda of a Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
The Rotterdam Verandah stateroom as a spacious balcony.

There is ample room for outdoor furniture which includes two reclining armchairs with ottomans, as well as a cocktail table.

The verandah is a private hideaway, and a great place to enjoy solitude – especially on busy sea days.

A generously sized bathroom

The real surprise in the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom is the bathroom. It’s not just the generous size that pleases, but also its bright and modern design.

This picture shows a bathroom in a Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
The bathroom is spacious, with a large walk-in shower.
This picture shows the vanity in a Verandah Stateroom bathroom on Rotterdam.
The vanity has space for personal effects.

There is a large walk-in shower with a glass door that closes tightly, so there are never any leaks. Also, there is a good sized basin as well as a stone vanity – it has plenty of space for toiletries. In addition there are glass storage shelves and extra storage space under the vanity.

Storage space

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom has just enough storage space. There is a closet with hanging room for two large cases full of clothing. In addition there is a small set of drawers.

The closet in the Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom.
There is ample storage space in the closet.

It’s worth noting that there are two extra drawers under the foot of the bed. These are great for storing bulky clothing or items you might use less often.

Also, there is plenty of room to store even the largest hard shell luggage cases under the bed.

Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom floor plan

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom measures just 21.2 sq. m. / 228 sq. ft. including the verandah. However, some of the staterooms have extra deep balconies which are 16.4 sq. m. / 177 sq. ft. larger. It’s important to note that the inside space of these staterooms remains the same.

Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom floorplan.
Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom floorplan.

The Rotterdam Verandah Stateroom floor plan is typical for a premium cruise ship. There is a combined bedroom and sitting area with writing desk. The closet is in the hall and there is a well proportioned bathroom. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors lead on to the balcony.

Verandah Stateroom positions on Rotterdam

Rotterdam has a total of 851 Verandah Staterooms. These are spread across the length of the cruise ship from decks 4 to 11.

The Verandah Staterooms are sold in a range of categories including V, VA, VB, VC, VD, VE, VF, VH, VS. However, it Is important to note that the internal size is the same. The only difference is the size of the verandah, the view and/or the stateroom position.

VH category: These staterooms may have obstructed views due to the placement of lifeboats in front of the verandahs.
VS category: These staterooms are aft-facing with wake views.
VB and VF categories: These staterooms on deck 4 have larger verandahs.
V, VA and VH categories: These staterooms have a preferred midship location. If you are prone to seasickness I recommend selecting a stateroom in these categories.

The author sailed as a guest of Holland America Line.

About the Author: Jason Kerr

Jason is the founder and Managing Editor of The Luxury Cruise Review. He has a passion for travel, a weakness for espresso coffee and a love of Greek cuisine.

2 Comments

  1. Christopher Dean 29 Aug 2022 at 07:32 - Reply

    Jason

    I immensely enjoyed your presentation and had previously sent an e-mail to you that mentioned one small erroe you made. My dad was in the navy during world war 2 and this is what he told me:

    1) the fastest way to get seasick is to lounge in a deck chair and watch the railing and the sea go up and down I tried that as we were in the caribbean but the water was to calm. We had one woman who did get seasick waiting to be seated for dinner and THE SHIP HAD NOT YET LEFT PORT.

    2) the place to avoid seasickness is to be at the bow or the stern of the ship but not the midship as the bow dips and rises and the stern rolls but you get both in midships.

    3) if you start to feel seasick get up and walk but do not lie on your bed as it will get worse

    4) your stomach needs food in it which helps to combat seasickness, You may throw it up but keep on eating

    I was with my dad watching TV in july 1978 and we hear that 30 foot waves were hitting the Queen Elizabeth 2 in the Atlantic sea. My dad started laughing and when I asked him why he said that 30 foot waves were nothing as his ship would periodically have 100 foot waves come crashing down on their ship which was a corvette.

    • Jason Kerr 1 Sep 2022 at 00:13 - Reply

      Dear Christopher

      Thank you for your kind words and your insightful comment. My observations are twofold:

      1. Navy vessels of WWII did not have stabilisers. These are used in all modern cruise ships to ‘even out’ the rolling motion of the waves. In doing so they make the position of shortest moment (midship) most stable.

      2. Personal experience on board many cruise ships in rough weather leads me to midship locales for a smoother ride.

      It’s interesting stuff!

      Regards
      Jason Kerr
      Managing Editor

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